Wildlife Corridors in Urban Environments

Explore the different avenues that allow wildlife to travel in an urban environment and how Friends of the Urban Forest is installing sidewalk landscaping all around the city of San Francisco in order to connect wildlife corridors and create more permeable ground. Several bird and insect species important for pest management in the city are highlighted in this presentation, as well as the benefits of sidewalk landscaping to mature trees struggling to attain their maximum potential in an urban setting.

karla nagyKarla Nagy is a long time horticultural geek with a history of cultivating people and plants. She began her working life as a social worker, helping homeless and disabled men and women in downtown San Francisco. An urge to work outdoors led her to complete the Landscape Architecture Certificate program at the UC Berkeley Extension while working at Friends of the Urban Forest as a planting manager. She has worked in landscape architecture firms and on her own, designing and drafting landscapes and is close to completing the landscape architecture licensing exams. She is now the Assistant Program Director at FUF.

 

Madalyn WatkinsMadalyn Watkins graduated from the University of Arkansas with a BSc in environmental, soil, and water science. She is a Sidewalk Landscape Planting Manager for Friends of the Urban Forest and has previously volunteered and worked as a landscaper, an organic garden educator and volunteer coordinator, an agroforestry worker, and an orchard educator for Heifer International and several other non-profit organizations.

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